David Lancaster is a composer whose work has been performed, recorded and broadcast internationally.

 

Born in Wigan (UK), David Lancaster first encountered contemporary music when as a young cornet player he took part in a performance of Harrison Birtwistle's 'Grimethorpe Aria' at a brass band summer school. Music studies at York and Cambridge Universities and at Dartington Summer School (with Peter Maxwell Davies) followed, along with a period as Composer-in-Residence at Charterhouse. He gained a number of important awards including Lloyds Bank Young Composer Award, Michael Tippett Award, LCM Centenary Prize and the Huddersfield Contemporary Music Festival Composer Award; the Parke Ensemble presented a London concert series of his work and in May 2011 there was a major retrospective concert devoted to his work at York St John University.


David’s recent work includes music for choir, string quartet and several song cycles, such as Memory of Place (which sets poetry by the York-based poet Daniela Nunnari and which has recently been issued on CD on the Meridian label).  David’s choral work Fallen, originally composed for a performance in Canterbury Cathedral, was used in a documentary made for Sky Television and later became part of the Vestiges of Spirituality multimedia installation.


In 2014 his work has been heard around the UK and also as far afield as Hong Kong and the USA.  A particular highlight was the premiere performance of the large-scale choral work Apocalypse, sung by The 24 under the direction of Robert Hollingworth on June 14th.  

 

In 2015 Strike was premiered in Hong Kong and Strata was recorded in the Czech Republic, for release on the Ablaze label; in 2016 Apocalypse was performed in Copenhagen by the Danish Radio Vocal Ensemble, and Late Music featured two new pieces: Hiraeth (for the Albany Piano Trio) and Breathless (for brass quintet).

2017 saw the first American performance of Fallen and the premiere of The Dark Gate, a song cycle for Peyee Chen and Kate Ledger based on the words of David Vogel who perished at Auschwitz in 1944; Gentle  (for soprano and marimba) was released on CD by PercusSing. In March 2018 the Delta Saxophone Quartet released a new recording of Swan.

In 2018 David completed a large-scale collaborative project Music of a Thousand Breaths with poet Abi Curtis (performed in July amongst the extensive medieval wall paintings in Pickering Church which inspired them) and a major choral/orchestral setting of John Donne’s Holy Sonnets for the Oxford Harmonic Choir, to be performed in June 2019.


In 2016 David successfully completed PhD in Composition at University of York (supervised by Prof. Roger Marsh) and is Director of Music at York St John University.   He is currently the Director of York's Late Music concert series.  

From 2019 David's music will be published by UYMP.

A B O U T

P R E S S

What carved a more specific profile and won the laurels was David Lancaster's Ricercare...a significant piece. His command of brass vocabulary is broad but beautifully precise - a genuinely idiomatic piece of work. (Michael John White, The Independent)

 

Echoes from a Phantom City for flute, viola, and harp is an intriguingly different conception — a grave little processional of interacting musical images, somehow much more imposing than its small dimensions and gentle scoring would imply.  (Malcolm Hayes, Tempo)

 

David Lancaster…used the difficult medium with bold ingenuity.  (John Martin, The Guardian)

 

Long melancholic lines were tastefully placed with more rhythmic material in this heartfelt piece. This was the highlight of the evening. (Martin Scheuregger, York Press)

 

Lancaster’s piece was one of nobly fashioned melodies becoming fractured and frenzied, then quiet in portrayal of madness and death.  (Paul Griffiths, The Times)

 

David Lancaster’s cleverly-planned Six Downie Nocturnes…combined a deep melancholy with evanescent bursts of inspiration. (Martin Dreyer, York Press)

 

The clarinet and piano duo … radiated a consistent brightness in David Lancaster’s punchily spirited, tough Seconds into Infinity.  (Stephen Pettitt, The Times)

 

David Lancaster’s intriguing Bliss, to words from an old English carol, brought an enigmatic dissonance to its title word and omens of the Passion to “in excelsis gloria”. (Martin Dreyer, York Press)

 

David Lancaster’s Swan was a very impressive work. The opening had a mysterious, almost elemental sound that was very distinctive. The transition to a funky, driven last section was as pleasing as it was unexpected. (York Mix)

 

David Lancaster’s After Ophelia was an intensely dramatic piece, well constructed, and given an absorbing, thoughtful performance.  (Michael Tumelty, The Scotsman)

 

David Lancaster’s Snow / Dance took Debussy’s The Snow is Dancing as its source material.  The resulting score wove a series of intricate variants on the original material rather than departing too far from the source.  Lancaster’s own idiom eventually came into focus but the transition was effected subtly and with considerable panache.  In the upper reaches of the keyboard and sounding like a distant chiming of bells, the final section was especially evocative.   (Paul Conway, Musical Opinion)

Each of the new numbers is a winner, notably David Lancaster’s ‘Confound Winter’, exhorting us to ‘melt occasional snow’. (theartsdesk.com, December 2018)

© 2012 - 2019 by David Lancaster

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